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Posts published in April 2022

Op-Ed: I confessed to all of my crushes, and you should too

I am a hopeless romantic. I love love. Not only the concept, but also the feeling of it. And if you were my roommate, you would be tired of hearing the stories I had with guys that I’ve recently seen. But I'm not here to talk about these guys, so don’t worry. I’m here to explain the hope and beauty of being a hopeless romantic. 

For the first time in 21 years, residential waste generation exceeded commercial generation

After living in the United States for a year, among many other things, I was struck by the  number of packages delivered daily to my building and passing through the streets of Seattle. It's easier to find stacks of boxes on my neighbors' doors than to see the sunrise. I can't lie, I also get a lot of boxes. More than I should. I have bought more online here than I have ever in my entire existence.

Reason for hope: A look at the Mariners coming season

“We're really excited to get back and play in front of them,” said Mariners outfielder Jarred Kelenic as the Seattle Mariners began their opening homestand against the Houston Astros last Friday, April 15. As the dawn of a new season begins, it's important to take a step back and recognize where the expectations of success came from for this playoff-hungry team. 

Acquiring the Taste: The obscurity and quality of Gentle Giant

There’s a common trope among musicians and music fans involving the popularity of music, or lack thereof. One person might decry another’s favorite artist as “too mainstream,” disqualifying or invalidating their output by that metric. A fan of grunge music whose favorite band is Nirvana might hear that the band has become overplayed and lost its edge due to success, and that real, hardcore grunge fans only listen to a garage band formed in Klamath Falls, Oregon in 1991 that nobody’s ever heard of. Of course, everyone is entitled to their opinion, but some seem to directly associate obscurity and quality.

Coffee tastes better unionized

There are many elements that make a good cup of coffee: top quality beans, state-of-the-art  machines, proper technique, and, arguably the most important of all, happy baristas. After their March 22 win as the first Starbucks location in the state of Washington to unionize, the Starbucks at 101 Broadway E. might be getting closer to brewing the perfect cup of coffee. 

Earth Day: Choosing action

Humans are destroying this planet. I don’t believe this is new information to the majority of us. We have all seen the increasing number of natural disasters, the waste being dumped on the land and in the sea, and even a change in local temperature. Any day you flip onto a news channel, you are likely to see at least one segment or statistic pointing towards climate change. And we are to blame. Our ceaseless desire for material possessions and financial gain is degrading our planet at an alarming rate. 

Christina Quarles: The universal experience of existing

“Los Angeles–based artist Christina Quarles paints ambiguous figures who stretch, intertwine, and merge in and with their surroundings, their bodies subjected not only to the weight and gravity of the physical world, but also to the pleasures and pressures of the social realm.” That is the greeting I received when entering the exhibit at the Frye Art Museum, the one that prepared me very little for what I was about to experience—which is the point, I realized, because what I experienced was a transcendence from my own self, and my world became acrylic, and colorful, and full of grief.

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